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Veterans

    Results: 17

  • Anger Management (2)
    RP-1400.8000-070

    Anger Management

    RP-1400.8000-070

    Programs that provide educational and/or therapeutic opportunities for people who are interested in or who need to learn how to deal with their anger in a positive, functional way. Participants may include people who internalize their anger as well as those who act it out verbally or in behavior toward friends, family, children, employers or other people in their lives. Included are court-ordered and voluntary programs for people who are involved in domestic violence or child abuse as well as general workshops for people who are uncomfortable with the way they express their anger.
  • Brain Injury Rehabilitation (1)
    LR-1570.2000

    Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    LR-1570.2000

    Rehabilitation programs that develop an individually tailored treatment plan that combines the resources of physical, occupational and speech/language therapists; physiatrists (physical medicine specialists); neuropsychologists/psychiatrists; cognitive rehabilitation therapists; rehabilitation nurses; vocational counselors; social workers and/or other specialists to help individuals who have been disabled by an acquired brain injury attain their maximum level of functioning and quality of life. Common disabilities experienced by ABI patients following acute treatment and medical stabilization include problems with cognition (thinking, memory, and reasoning), sensory processing (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell), communication (expression and understanding), and behavior or mental health (depression, anxiety, personality changes, aggression, acting out, and social inappropriateness). Therapy generally focuses on behavioral management, neuropsychological adaptation, environmental structuring, eating and swallowing management, cognitive and communication skills, daily living and social skills, self-care, ambulation, academic and vocational skills, and community reintegration. The goal of brain injury rehabilitation is to restore functions and skills that can be recovered and to help patients learn to do things differently when functioning cannot be restored to pre-injury levels.
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (1)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Homeless Financial Assistance Programs (5)
    NL-1000.3000

    Homeless Financial Assistance Programs

    NL-1000.3000

    Programs authorized under federal or state legislation or local government initiatives that provide financial assistance for the express purpose of obtaining temporary shelter, emergency housing or permanent housing for individuals and/or families who are homeless or imminently homeless. Expenses may include rental deposits, rent assistance, utility deposits, moving expenses, expenses associated with non-shelter temporary housing in situations where permanent housing has been secured but is currently unavailable, and other costs the family may incur in the process of acquiring or maintaining housing. Allowable activities, eligibility criteria and other requirements vary depending on the funding source.
  • Homeless Shelter (4)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • Military Family Service/Support Centers (1)
    TM-5100

    Military Family Service/Support Centers

    TM-5100

    Programs located at military installations throughout the world that handle inquiries from military personnel, retirees, reservists and their family members, do an assessment of their needs and refer them to sources of help available at the installation or in the local community. The centers may provide relocation assistance, transition assistance, family life programs (e.g., parenting, stress management), individual and family counseling, employment assistance, and financial management services as well as emergency assistance.
  • Military Transition Assistance Programs (2)
    TM-5200

    Military Transition Assistance Programs

    TM-5200

    Programs that provide guidance and information regarding benefits, services and outplacement assistance for active duty separtees and retirees and their family members returning to civilian life with the objective of making the transition as smooth and stress-free as possible. Services may include benefits counseling, employment search and placement assistance, relocation services, financial planning assistance, eligibility information regarding medical and dental insurance coverage and other forms of assistance to facilitate adjustment to civilian life. Special employment transition assistance includes certification of job skills and experience; information about applying active duty job skills and experience to private sector employment; information about geographic areas of relocation including the labor market and cost of living; identification and location of employment and training opportunities; instruction in resume preparation, job analysis and interview techniques; and information about loans and grants to facilitate acquisition of employment. Also included are programs that help National Guard and Reserve personnel who have been activated for deployment resolve issues pertaining to duty requirements and employment benefits.
  • Street Outreach Programs (2)
    PH-8000

    Street Outreach Programs

    PH-8000

    Programs that are staffed by outreach workers who spend time with people who live on the street, build relationships with them, identify and address their immediate needs (e.g., crisis intervention, food, clean clothing, hygiene kits, blankets, someone to listen) and provide information about and linkage to longer-term forms of support such as shelter, counseling, drug and alcohol detoxification and rehabilitation, care/case management and, where applicable, family reunification services. Street outreach programs may be staffed by volunteers or peers who were formerly homeless; and may target special populations such as homeless youth at risk for sexual abuse or exploitation, veterans, or people with specific medical or mental health conditions, or be available to the larger homeless population.
  • Suicide Counseling (4)
    RP-1400.8000-825

    Suicide Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-825

    Programs that provide in-person individual, conjoint, family or group treatment for people who are experiencing an emotional crisis and are attempting to cope by threatening or attempting self-destruction; or for people who have experienced these feelings, made such threats or attempted to fatally harm themselves either on one occasion or repeatedly; and/or for the families and significant others of these people.
  • Suicide Prevention Hotlines (1)
    RP-1500.1400-800

    Suicide Prevention Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-800

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for individuals who are having suicidal feelings with the objective of helping them explore alternatives to self-harm or self-destruction. Suicide prevention workers establish and maintain contact with the individual while identifying and clarifying the focal problem, evaluate the suicidal potential, assess the individual's strengths and resources, and mobilize available resources including paramedic or police intervention and emergency psychiatric care as needed. These programs can also help individuals who are worried about the potentially suicidal behavior of another with the objective of helping them identify warning signs and provide options on seeking further help. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Veteran Benefits Assistance (9)
    FT-1000.9000

    Veteran Benefits Assistance

    FT-1000.9000

    Programs that provide assistance for veterans who are having difficulty understanding and/or obtaining the full benefits and services to which they are entitled by law based on service to their country. The programs may help veterans understand the eligibility criteria for benefits, the benefits provided by the program, the payment process and the rights of beneficiaries; provide consultation and advice; help them complete benefits application forms; negotiate on their behalf with U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs staff; and/or represent them in administrative processes or judicial litigation. Included are veteran rights organizations that offer a range of advocacy services as well as legal aid programs that offer more formalized legal assistance.
  • Veteran Education Benefits (33)
    HL-8000.1800-900

    Veteran Education Benefits

    HL-8000.1800-900

    Programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or other organizations that provide educational financial assistance for veterans and service personnel and their eligible dependents. Veterans and service personnel who served on active duty between January 31, 1955 and January 1, 1977 for specified periods of time are eligible for a variety of education benefits under the GI Bill including a stipend for tuition assistance at approved educational institutions. Veterans and service personnel who entered active duty after January 1, 1977 may participate in a voluntary contributory plan in which the individual's savings for a future education are administered and augmented by the government. Partial educational assistance is also available to the survivors of deceased or disabled veterans whose death or permanent and total disability was service-connected; and to the spouses and children of servicemen and women who have been listed for more than 90 days as missing in action, captured in the line of duty or forcibly detained by a foreign power.
  • Veteran Membership Organizations (9)
    TD-1400.9000

    Veteran Membership Organizations

    TD-1400.9000

    Programs whose members are veterans who have joined together on a voluntary basis to promote mutual interests. Activities may include advocacy for the preservation and expansion of earned privileges and benefits, testimony before Congress on issues affecting veterans, awards and other measures for promoting appreciation of and recognition for veterans and their accomplishments, community service programs, and social activities for members. Some organizations may provide active support for the democratic principles of religious and political freedom; offer benefits such as health insurance, life insurance, credit cards and financial planning services for members; or maintain special burial funds to help indigent veterans and their families.
  • Veteran Outpatient Clinics (2)
    LN-9000

    Veteran Outpatient Clinics

    LN-9000

    Outpatient medical facilities operated by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs that provide routine primary medical care for eligible veterans. Services generally include x-rays, general health check ups, blood pressure checks, treatment for basic illnesses and laboratory tests.
  • Veteran Support Groups (9)
    PN-8100.4500-850

    Veteran Support Groups

    PN-8100.4500-850

    Mutual support groups whose members were previously affiliated with one of the branches of the armed forces, their families and friends. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; may focus on former prisoners of war, veterans of specific wars, e.g., the Gulf War, women who are veterans or other specific veteran populations; and allow participants to share their experience, strengths and hopes and put their lives back together if they have been troubled by homelessness, disability, substance abuse, depression or other issues related to their service to the country.
  • Veteran/Military Health Insurance (2)
    NS-8000.9000

    Veteran/Military Health Insurance

    NS-8000.9000

    Programs administered by the Department of Defense (DoD) Health Affairs Office or the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs that provide health benefits coverage for eligible military personnel, eligible veterans and eligible dependents.
  • Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (2)
    LL-3000.9000

    Veterans Affairs Medical Centers

    LL-3000.9000

    Health care facilities operated by the U.S. government that provide inpatient and outpatient medical, surgical and psychiatric care for eligible veterans.
 
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